ERIC KRAUSE

In business since 1996
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ERIC KRAUSE GENEALOGY

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LYNDA'S CORNER 
Lynda Jean Richards, b. Rimmer, m. Krause

               

GENEALOGY

MATERNAL SIDE

THE CHWEDCHUKS IN POLAND, BALARUS AND RUSSIA

SHALAGIN DESCENDANTS

MAXIMOVNA VASILIEVICH SHALAGIN

Children:
      

(1) [Female]: Alexandra (Sonia) Maximovna Shalagin (November 6, 1902-April 16, 1984)
     

(2) [Male]: Nikolai Shalagin ([?] -1956)
     

(3) [Female]: Pelagia (Polya) Shalagin ([?] -1979)
     

(4) [Female]: Natalia Shalagin and [husband] Efimov Grigoriev

     

(1) Zoya Grigoriev

  

(2) Unknown male Grigoriev

   

(3) Unknown male Grigoriev

ALEXANDRA (SONIA) MAXIMOVNA SHALAGIN


ANCESTRAL GENEALOGICAL NOTES

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Toward the end of 1921, with fighting between the revolutionary and counterrevolutionary forces having come to a close, people started to muster their energies in an attempt to restore normal civilian life. Anton Chwedchuk and his family, however, had become homesick by this time; after all, it was over seven years since they had left home in the village of Stara Strelna near Kobrin in Belorussia. Certainly they must have made some friends in the area near Ufa, but they had no house of their own there, while back in Anton's home there was some land on which they could make a living, and perhaps a house and barn, if they had not been destroyed during the war.

It must have been a difficult thing for Alexandra, however, to leave her family, friends and home behind and take off with a new husband and his family on a trek of about 2000 kilometers ....

[Later: 1970 and 1976 visits by Alexandra (Sonia) Maximovna Shalagin (November 6, 1902-April 16, 1984)]

The job did wonders for mother's frame of mind. It gave her a feeling of being useful, a recognition of her abilities, some independence, and a pension from the hospital, as well as entitlement to the Canadian Pension Plan after she retired. Her savings, along with the rent from the farm, enabled her to send parcels of clothing every year to her widowed niece Zoya and her six children in the Soviet Union, as well as to take two trips there to visit her own two sisters in 1970 and 1976. Those two trips on the ship Pushkin across the Atlantic to Leningrad, and by air from there to Beloretsk near her home town in the Ural Mountains were the highlights of mother's life after she left the farm. They were real adventures, including a ride in the country in a motorcycle side car with her sister and brother in law, getting stuck on a muddy road and having to stay overnight at a farm house. On another occasion, she took a chance to go to the large industrial city of Magnitogorsk by bus with her sister, only to be confronted by the KGB police the next day for violating rules about visiting places without prior permission. Amazingly, there was not the slightest qualm or hesitation about making these trips by herself, although she hoped that I would come with her on another one after I retired. ....

SOURCES


ADDITIONAL SHALAGIN GENEALOGICAL RESOURCES