ERIC KRAUSE

In business since 1996
- © Krause House Info-Research Solutions -

62 Woodill Street, Sydney, NS,
Canada, B1P 4N9

krausehouse@krausehouse.ca
 

ERIC KRAUSE REPORTS

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MAJOR UNITED STATES RESEARCH TRIPS SERIES
    

August 13 to September 21, 2003 Research Trip Highlights
  
Research Trip to the United States: Ottawa (Canada) / Springfield (Illinois) / St. Louis (Missouri) ~ August 13 to September 21, 2003  

SAINTE GENEVIEVE, MISSOURI

Eric Krause, Krause House Info-Research Solutions
September 21, 2003

"Ste. Genevieve is a French settlement dating from the 1740's unique for its many restored buildings of French architectural design."  In 1762, the town came under Spanish control until sold to the United States in 1803 as part of the Louisiana Purchase. The village of Sainte Genevieve has numerous original buildings still extant from the 18th-early 19th-centuries representing the poteaux-en-terre and poteaux-sur-sole construction techniques.  

It is claimed that the Bolduc house - a National Historic Landmark - built c. 1785 in the poteaux-sur-sole style is the "most authentically restored Creole house in the nation." "Part of this house was constructed from Louis Bolduc's 1770 home which stood on the original site of Ste.  Genevieve." [Janice C. Wehmeyer, Ste. Genevieve, Mo, A Guided Tour Through the Past and Present (Ste. Genevieve: Wehmeyer Printing Co, 2000]

An e-mail will be sent to determine if they have the answers to some of the questions that the Fortress has re its "charpente" constructions. The reply will be posted here when it is received. 

National Society of the Colonial Dames of America

The National Society of The Colonial Dames of America is dedicated to furthering an appreciation of our national heritage through historic preservation, patriotic service and educational projects.  The NSCDA, founded in 1891, is an unincorporated association of 44 Corporate Societies with over 15,000 members.  The Society headquarters is located at Dumbarton House

Another building of interest is the Amoureux House built c. 1792 in the poteaux-en-terre style with its walls of vertical cedar logs set directly in the ground (i.e. without a foundation). It is one of three known examples in the town and one of only five throughout the United States that have survived since their construction. Today it is one of the buildings making up the Felix Vallé House State Historic site. An e-mail will be sent to determine if they have the answers to some of the questions that the Fortress has re its "charpente" constructions. The reply will be posted here when it is received. 

Missouri Department of Natural Resources


E-MAIL

To whom it may concern [National Society of the Colonial Dames of America]:

First, let me introduce myself. I am now retired from the Fortress of Louisbourg, National Historical Site, Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, Canada, where for 25 years I was an historian and Historical Records Supervisor. If you wish to know more about me, please consult my web at:
http://www.krausehouse.ca/krause/ 

In September of this year, I was on an historical research trip that took me to, among other places, the Missouri Historical Society where I found much in my area of interest: 18th century French construction techniques and materials which the Fortress of Louisbourg might find useful. Their official research site (for which I am web master) is as follows: 
Web fortress.uccb.ns.ca 

For your interest, the Fortress of Louisbourg is the largest reconstruction project of its type ever undertaken in North America

Now to the point. I also visited the village of Sainte Genevieve which has numerous original buildings still extant from the 18th-early 19th-centuries representing the poteaux-en-terre and poteaux-sur-sole construction techniques. The claim that the Bolduc house, built c. 1785, in the poteaux-sur-sole style is the "most authentically restored Creole house in the nation" is most intriguing.

Since this and the other buildings of the town may have associated historical structural records that guide you in the interpretation of the Bolduc house and others like it, I am interested in what that might be. A list of any published, and, in particular, unpublished in-house reports would be useful as would that of any reconstruction/restoration or building plans that you may have developed.

Thanks

Eric


To whom it may concern [Missouri Department of Natural Resources]:

First, let me introduce myself. I am now retired from the Fortress of Louisbourg, National Historical Site, Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, Canada, where for 25 years I was an historian and Historical Records Supervisor. If you wish to know more about me, please consult my web at:
http://www.krausehouse.ca/krause/ 

In September of this year, I was on an historical research trip that took me to, among other places, the Missouri Historical Society where I found much in my area of interest: 18th century French construction techniques and materials which the Fortress of Louisbourg might find useful. Their official research site (for which I am web master) is as follows: 
Web fortress.uccb.ns.ca 

For your interest, the Fortress of Louisbourg is the largest reconstruction project of its type ever undertaken in North America

Now to the point. I also visited the village of Sainte Genevieve which has numerous original buildings still extant from the 18th-early 19th-centuries representing the poteaux-en-terre and poteaux-sur-sole construction techniques.
One building of particular interest is the Amoureux House built in the poteaux-en-terre style with its walls of vertical cedar logs set directly in the ground.

Since this and the other buildings of the town may have associated historical structural records that guide you in the interpretation of the
Amoureux House and others like it, I am interested in what that might be. A list of any published, and, in particular, unpublished in-house reports would be useful as would that of any reconstruction/restoration or building plans that you may have developed.

Thanks

Eric