ERIC KRAUSE

In business since 1996
- © Krause House Info-Research Solutions -

62 Woodill Street, Sydney, NS,
Canada, B1P 4N9

krausehouse@krausehouse.ca


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RANDALL HOUSE REPORTS

Randall House Museum, Wolfville, Nova Scotia, Canada
http://wolfvillehs.ednet.ns.ca/


 

Historic Randall House

©McGill University


RANDALL HOUSE

CONDITION REPORT

A PRELIMINARY CHECK LIST OF CONSERVATION
OBSERVATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

By Eric Krause

Krause House Info-Research Solutions

November 14, 2008

Floor Plans (Source)

      

     

    

Basement

 

First Floor

 

Second Floor

 

Attic Floor

MAIN HOUSE

(*Noted previously in the 1996 Jost Report - Included here since the condition may re-appear)

ELEMENT

Common Name/Room Number/Geographic Location

Conservation Observations

Actions Recommended

 

 

 

 

MAIN HOUSE

 

 

 

 

EXTERIOR
WALLS

 

 

 

 

 

North Facade

*1. Walls, roof eaves, and fascia.

1. Paint as required. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

West Facade

*1. Some clapboards in some areas are no longer tight-fitting, have pulled away from those beneath, and thus are no longer weather-tight.

*2. Walls, roof eaves, and fascia.

1. Re-secure the clapboards.

2. Paint as required. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

  South Facade

*1. Walls, roof eaves, and fascia.

1. Paint as required. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

East Facade

*1. Some clapboards in some areas (e.g. north-east corner) are no longer tight-fitting, have pulled away from those beneath, and thus are no longer weather-tight.

*2. Walls, roof eaves, and fascia.

*1. Re-secure the clapboards.

2. Paint as required. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

 

 

 

EXTERIOR FOUNDATION

 

 

 

 

 

North Facade

1. The rendered finish is in good condition.

1. An analysis of the composition of the rendering is in order for its historical accuracy and for its affect upon the foundation bricks beneath. Even then, pointing rather than rendering would have perhaps been more proper.

West Facade

*1. The wall bows horizontally, about 2", towards the centre - and inward at the north end [where] there is a split indicating a horizontal shift of about 1/2" where the foundation may have been mortared at one time -  on the exterior, but vertically within the Basement.

2. The sandstone joints are open.

3. The rendered finish over the brick portion is in good condition.

*1. Any inward movement would require shoring on the interior.

Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

2. A proper pointing of the stones is required and would be more historically accurate.

3. An analysis of the composition of the rendering is in order for its historical accuracy and for its affect upon the foundation bricks beneath. Even then, pointing rather than rendering would have perhaps been more proper.

South Facade

1. Required is a further examination.

-

East Facade

*1. The wall bows horizontally towards the centre on the exterior, but vertically within the Basement.

*2. The south east corner has slumped slightly.

3. The rendered finish is in good condition.

1. *Any inward movement would require shoring on the interior.

Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

2. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

3. An analysis of the composition of the rendering is in order for its historical accuracy and for its affect upon the foundation bricks beneath. Even then, pointing rather than rendering would have perhaps been more proper.

 

 

 

EXTERIOR
ROOF

 

 

 

 

 

North Pitch

1. No conservation concerns.

-

South Pitch

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

CHIMNEY
STACKS

 

 

 

 

 

West Chimney

*1. Water is entering the flues and getting into most fireboxes, depositing their moisture, ash, soot, spalling, and brick clay dust.

*1. A long term concern suggesting several solutions including a complete sealing of the chimney cap (This action may however produce condensation).

2008 Recommendation:

Monitor immediately whether water is still getting into the flues. If so, remedial action is required as soon as possible.

East Chimney

*1. Water is entering the flues and getting into most fireboxes, depositing there moisture, ash, soot, spalling, and brick clay dust.

*1. A long term concern suggesting several solutions including a complete sealing of the chimney cap (This action may however produce condensation).

2008 Recommendation:

Monitor immediately whether water is still getting into the flues. If so, remedial action is required as soon as possible.

 

 

 

BASEMENT
(00 Series)

 

 

 

 

 

Room 001 /South East of Stairwell

1. Dry rot is apparent on the surfaces of the timber crib work of the fireplace base.

2. The west support for the hearth cradle of Room 101 is split.

3. The Cold Tech Cooler/Freezer is producing excessive moisture.

4. The floor opposite the Exterior Basement Stairwell is collecting some moisture.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing. The wood/masonry matrix appears to be sound without any evidence of any beam failure.

2.  Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

3. Re-locate the cooler/freezer.

4. Monitor within the Exterior Basement Stairwell to determine if natural water seepage after a rain is entering the Basement.

Room 001 /South West of Stairwell

1. Dry rot is apparent on the surfaces of the timber crib work of the fireplace base.

2. Wooden supports for the hearth cradle of Room 108 above are resting on the masonry rather than on a wooden cross beam.

*3. The September 1993 remedial action taken to re-support the collapsed hearth of the fireplace of Room 109 above requires some upgrading.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing. The wood/masonry matrix appears to be sound without any evidence of any beam failure.

2. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing. Perhaps best to insert at least one added "modern" beam from hearth to wooden cross beam.

3. The upgrading occurred in c. 2007.

Room 001 /North West of Stairwell

1. An earlier conservation effort that included netting was taken to preserve the lath and plaster ceiling of the finished room.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Room 001 /North West of Stairwell

1. The plaster on the south wall is in a state of extreme deterioration.

1. Introduce the same netting as on the ceiling, or other material, to preserve this area for interpretative purposes. The Duck boards should be left sufficiently far away to discourage touching.

 

 

 

BASEMENT
STAIRWELL
(Central)

 

 

 

 

 

-

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

EXTERIOR BASEMENT
STAIRWELL
(South East)

 

 

 

 

 

-

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

FIRST FLOOR
(100 Series)

 

 

 

 

 

Room 110 /Front (Main) Hall /North
 

1. To the west of the stairwell, next to it, from the newel post to the Room 107, the hardwood flooring (running north-south) has lifted c. along the line of the Basement "summer" beam, which beam is presently jack-supported.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing. This issue was not mentioned in the 1996 Jost Report . It appears to be related to the re-positioning of one of the steel lally columns in the Basement to beneath this area. This post should be re-examined, followed by some positive action.

The south door should not be reset or planed to pass over the bulge.

Room 101 /Dining Room /North East
 

*1. Possible settlement cracks in the south head frames of the doorways leading to Room 102 kitchen and closet beneath the kitchen stairway.

2. An east-west bulge in the original plaster ceiling exists just north of the fireplace. This feature exists at c. the same distance from the fireplace as in room 109.

*3. The paint on the floor is peeling, particularly in the south east corner.

*4. The west door, which (including the door frame) is paint chipped on this side, to Room 110 is binding at the wind rail.

5. Slight sag in the floor as one approaches Room 102.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

2. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

*3. An on-going maintenance requirement that as this paint fails naturally it should be re-painted as required. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

*4. Reset door, or plane to fit, prior to next painting.

5. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Room 102 /Passageway
 

*1. The flue plug is loose.

2. A slight sag exists in the floor.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

2. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Room 103 /Kitchen /South East
 

*1. The floor has considerable spring since the new flooring joists did not provide proper support.

*2. The replaced ceiling has cracks, running north-south.

3. Where once stood the original east wall, a considerable east-west bulge at the south ground sill level exists.

*4. Staining within the fireplace suggests that water is leaking down the plugged flue.

5. A slight sag exists in the floor, as one approaches Room 102.

6. The closet in the west wall has an original ceiling.

1. The proper support was completed in the spring of 2000.

2. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

3. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

4. See the CHIMNEY STACKS section.

5. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

6. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Room 107 /Rear Hall /South
 

1. No conservation concerns.

-

Room 108 /Back Sitting Room (Study) /South West
 

1. An east-west bulge at south ground sill level exists, in line with the one in Room 103, with the flooring falling away to the north.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Room 109 /Living (DeWolf Parlour) Room /North West

1. An east-west bulge in the original plaster ceiling exists just north of the fireplace. This feature exists at c. the same distance from the fireplace as in room 101.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

 

 

 

MAIN
STAIRWELL
(Central)

1. The handrail of the stairwell is bowed near the top, with a spring to it at that point that has produced a groove in the west stairwell trimmer.

2. The handrail on the guardrail at its north west turn has slightly separated.

1. Brace the handrail at this point in some unobtrusive, or obviously modern explainable, manner, to prevent further damage.

1. Monitor its stability on a daily basis to see if the separation is stable.

 

 

 

KITCHEN
STAIRWELL
(Central)

 

 

 

 

 

-

1. Treads.

 

 

1. The treads are considerably worn, but appear presently to be in fair repair. Restrict the use of this stairwell, and monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

 

 

 

SECOND FLOOR
(200 Series)

 

 

 

 

 

200 Series of rooms

*1. Numerous cracks exist in the ceilings, generally running north-south.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Bedroom /Room 201 /North East

*1. Both the plaster and paper of the face of the chimney has suffered old water damage.

2. The bricks within the fireplace are soft.

*3. Deterioration [of the soft bricks] within the firebox and chimney opening of the fireplace is occurring.

4. The rendered finish of the fireplace is in good condition.

*5. The insert panel beneath the east window displays some displacement.

*6. The floors slope away from the chimney on the north and south sides.

*7. The ceiling is cracked.

8. The original ceiling in the closet is in excellent condition.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

2.  An on-going maintenance concern. See "The issue of mortar" section.

3. See the CHIMNEY STACKS section.

4. An analysis of the composition of the rendering is in order for its historical accuracy and for its affect upon the foundation bricks beneath.

5. Check for moisture.

6. *This displacement may have ended some time ago.

This condition is in line with the bulge in the ceiling in room 101 and the flooring in Room 207. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

7. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

8. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Hall /Room 202

1. Severe, deep paint alligatoring exists on the door to the Attic Stairwell.

*2.  Considerable paint alligatoring exists on the door to Room 204.

*3.Paint on the north vertical board partition wall is deteriorating.

4. The flooring falls away (slumps) to the south at a point where the north partition of Room 203 ends. Here, to the north of the slump, perhaps once existed a stairwell centred upon the Attic Stairwell.

1. A possible cosmetic issue whether to paint or not to paint. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

2.  A possible cosmetic issue whether to paint or not to paint. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

3. A cosmetic issue whether to paint or not to paint. See "The issue of paint" for a paint recommendation.

4. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Bedroom /Room 203 /South East

*1. Water from leaks from the roof of the South Ell has damaged the west wall.

*2. Water from leaks from the roof of the South Ell has produced moisture damage along the south window.

*3. There is moisture damage along the [east] window. The paper is peeling and the paint is peeling.

4. The slump of Room 202 continues into this room.

5. The closet has an original ceiling.

6. The top casings of the doors and windows suggest some wall displacement - one inch from east to west, but none north to south on the east wall, but 1 inch on the west wall running south to north. This is clearly visible even though the ceilings have been replaced.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

2. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

3. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

4. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

5. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

6. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

 

 

Bathroom /Room 204

*1. A significant north-south crack exists in the ceiling.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

Centre Hall (Upstairs) /Room /205 South

1. No conservation concerns.

-

Bedroom (Children's)  /Room 206 /South West

1. The bricks within the fireplace are soft.

*2. Significant deterioration exists on the face of the fireplace.

*3. Water damage exists in the flue hole of the chimney.

*4. The insert panel beneath the west window displays some displacement.

5. Cracking was found in the original ceiling in the closet.

 

1. An on-going maintenance concern. See "The issue of mortar" section.

2. An analysis of the composition of the rendering is in order for its historical accuracy and for its affect upon the foundation bricks beneath.

3. See the CHIMNEY STACKS section.

4. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

5. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

 

 

Closet /[Connector Room between Rooms 206 and 207]

1. No obvious conservation concerns.

 

Main Bedroom (Patriquin) /Room 207 /North West

*1. A crack in the ceiling runs east-west.

*2. Cracks, running north-south exist inside the door to the centre hall.

*3. Cracks, running north-south exist over the bed.

4. The bricks within the fireplace are soft.

*5. The lintel above the fireplace has slumped.

6. Two metal pins support the metal grating within the fireplace flue opening and some settling of this feature has occurred.

7. The rendered finish of the fireplace has cracked.

8. The fireplace hearth and the flooring to the east and west of it sit higher than the remaining flooring to the north.

1. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

2. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

3. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

4. An on-going maintenance concern. See "The issue of mortar" section.

5. Monitor next season if this feature is stable.

6. Monitor next season if this feature is stable.

7. An analysis of the composition of the rendering is in order for its historical accuracy and for its affect upon the foundation bricks beneath.

8. This condition is in line with the bulge in the ceiling in room 109 and the flooring in Room 201. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing. This issue was not mentioned in the 1996 Jost Report though it was mentioned for Room 201.

Sewing Room /Room 208 /North

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

ATTIC
STAIRWELL
(East)

 

 

 

 

 

-

1. Top tread is cracked.

2. The south face of the chimney, rendered with mortar, is in fair repair.

1. Repair required.

2. An analysis of the composition of the rendering is in order for its historical accuracy and for its affect upon the foundation bricks beneath.

 

 

 

ATTIC
(300 Series)

 

 

 

 

 

Area 301 /South East

1. The lower portion of the chimney stack consists of soft, original, crumbling bricks.

1. An on-going maintenance concern. See "The issue of mortar" section.

Area 301

1. Three of the south-side ties of the original collar-tied rafters are twisted and have pulled away from their half-dovetail lapped, mortise and tenon connection.

1. Install a *bracket or *scab to insure a positive connection.

Room 302 /South West

1. The lower portion of the chimney stack consists of soft, original, crumbling bricks.

1. An on-going maintenance concern. See "The issue of mortar" section.

Room 303 /North West

1. The plaster walls and ceiling are deteriorating in a number of areas.

*2. There is non-current water damage on the plaster where it has been applied to the side of the chimney.

*3. The floor slopes towards the chimney.

1. Perhaps introduce the same netting as on the ceiling in the Basement (Room 001 /North West of Stairwell), or other material, to preserve this area for interpretative purposes.

2. Monitor if there is a present stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

3. Monitor its current stability each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing.

 

 

Room 300 Series 

*1. The loads experienced in the Attic overstressed the plaster ceilings of the Second Floor. 

*1. Limit the number of people and display items.

 

 

 

SOUTH ELL

ELEMENT

Common Name/Room Number/Geographic Location

Conservation Observations

Actions Recommended

 

 

 

EXTERIOR FOUNDATION

 

 

 

 

 

-

1. Conservation concerns.

1. An investigation should be undertaken.

 

 

 

EXTERIOR
WALLS

 

 

South Facade

*1. Plywood was installed as a finish to the repaired sills at the back.

*1. Remove the plywood and replace it with shingles.

 

 

 

EXTERIOR
ROOF

 

 

 

 

 

East Pitch

*1. There is a lack of clearance between the east pitch of the roof and the south window of Room 203.

*1.  Monitor Room 203 and Room 103 each spring upon opening and each fall upon closing for moisture entering the main house.

 

 

 

FIRST FLOOR
(100 Series)

 

 

 

 

 

-

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

ATTIC
(200 Series)

 

 

 

 

 

-

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

NORTH ENTRANCE PORTICO (FRONT PORCH)

ELEMENT

Common Name/Room Number/Geographic Location

Conservation Observations

Actions Recommended

 

 

 

-

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

LANDSCAPE

ELEMENT

Common Name/Room Number/Geographic Location

Conservation Observations

Actions Recommended

 

 

 

North Side of House

1. No conservation concerns.

-

West Side of House

1. No conservation concerns.

-

South Side of House

*1. The grade exists higher in many locations than the top of the foundations of the South Ell and the main building.

*1. Lower (minimum 8" vertical clearance of any adjacent wooden feature) and slope the grade, to a distant southern swale, to prevent ground and gutter downspout water from draining back into the building.

  East Side of House

1. No conservation concerns.

-

 

 

 

 

GENERAL RECOMMENDATIONS
 

Conservation Observations

Actions Recommended

1.

The interpretative and maintenance plan.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.

For the building, and that of the landscape, any “Interpretative and Maintenance Plan” must include the Society's over-all philosophical viewpoint for their respective conservation. This philosophy, I would recommend, be minimal intervention that maximizes retention, the repair of deteriorated features, or its stabilization, and public explanation (through exhibit, guide, handout, publication, etc.) thereof.

This site holds a wealth of character-defining elements (as must be defined in a final "Historical Structural and Architectural Report", and  an "Archaeological Report"). These elements must be conserved whenever possible through a proper maintenance programme that "entails periodic inspection; routine, cyclical, non-destructive cleaning; minor repair and refinishing operations; [and] replacement of damaged or deteriorated materials that are impractical to save." [Parks Canada Standards Guidelines]

The Society must develop written standards for the refinishing and the replacement of character-defining elements such as original soft bricks, paint, plaster, etc. For example, damaged bricks can be repaired, or they can be replaced and if replaced, with what (vintage, salvaged, new, custom-made reproduction)? Paint removal can be limited with a reapplication of protective coatings but with what (historical oil-based, or modern)? Stress repairs using lime or earth-based or gypsum plaster upon historic materials applied in a traditional manner may seem logical, but would catastrophic failure necessarily mean dry-wall as a replacement? And while a major replacement of an element may seem obvious, a "Dutchman" repair (take out and replace only a part) may actually achieve the same goal.

2.

The review and chronicle of maintenance records.

2.

*Chronicle all maintenance decisions with written and photographic documentation.

3.

The review of other records.

3.

Review past treasury expenditures and the historical record to determine the date and type of earlier repairs or alterations.

4.

A final Historical Structural and Architectural Report

4.

A final report must identify, to the degree possible, the character defining building elements of the Main House, South Ell and landscape. Prior to its issue, several preliminary reports may be necessary so as to provide some direction as soon as possible. Together, a final historical report and the Interpretative and Maintenance Plan are vital to the development of any long-term Strategic Heritage Conservation Plan for the house.

5.

An Archaeological Report

5.

In the Basement, for example, the modern flooring of crushed stone, with sheet polyethylene beneath and a path of duck boards above, is no doubt protecting the possibility in the future of an archaeological investigation that could determine the original flooring material (of the formerly finished room in particular), or settle other matters.

On the property, for example, archaeology could provide many useful conclusions, including a determination if an historical rather than modern approach would address current drainage concerns.

6.

*The issue of building load.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6.

*Because the building does not meet current [load] requirements, place limits on the number of people in the building at any one time.

2008 Observations:

In the Basement, nothing suggests that the load upon any area from above is excessive. This would include upon the two fireplace bases, upon the perimeter foundations (bricks and stones), and upon the framing members of the First Floor. Here too, its flooring (ceiling) boards are in good condition, and perhaps are contributing additionally to building stiffness at First Floor level.

On the First Floor, where the ceilings are original, the top casings of windows and doors do not exhibit any evidence of building displacement or slumping when compared to ceiling levels.

On the Second Floor, where the ceilings have been replaced almost entirely, upper window and door framesall appear to be square and level to the ceilings excepting for the south-east room. The question remains however whether the original ceilings would have revealed any displacement.

In the Attic, running between the flooring joists are visible an unusual east-west, perhaps modern, arrangement of wooden members. They are possibly associated with a loose-fill insulation installed upon a plastic sheathing. They might now be playing an added role in a loading equation. When combined with a shelving system designed to distribute storage evenly and restrictively throughout the Attic, here might be a place quite useful to the Museum.

7.

*The assorted plumbing leaks throughout the house.

7.

*Cosmetic reasons only would dictate any action.

8.

The issue of paint.

 

 

 

 

 

 

8.

It is essential to take paint samples at assorted locations within and without the house (e.g. walls, ceilings, floors, etc.) to determine the original site-based 19th-century formulas and colours (based on the Munsell colour system).  Match both as closely as possible with modern equivalents.

Within the house, check to see if alligatoring (on doors for example) or paint failure (on walls and floors for example) is a result of natural aging, and exists through all layers. Such inspections may dictate what to do, whether to leave as is, to remove an outer layer(s) while leaving a lower one(s), or to remove all paint layers, sand, prime and repaint.

*Treat the spalling and chipping of existing floor paint as an on-going maintenance requirement that as this paint fails naturally it should be [conservatively removed] and re-painted where necessary. Record the location.

Likewise treat original flaking paint on ceilings, etc. Record the location.

Two coats of an oil-based paint upon a ceiling can serve as a proper vapour barrier where a conservation requirement may be in play. Such may be the case at the Attic Floor level (See “The issue of insulation and venting” section).

9.

The issue of mortar.

 

 

 

 

9.

It is essential to take mortar samples at assorted locations within and without the house (e.g. perimeter rubble stone and brick foundations, basement fireplace bases, walls, ceilings, interior chimney stacks, etc.) to establish the original site-based 19th-century formulas. In particular, determining that of the fireplace bases and of the perimeter foundations, whether lime- or earth-based, is important.

Treat the original mortar finishes as an artifact with an on-going maintenance requirement. When necessary always replace original like with like (for example a lime and sand mortar) and record the location. 

The parging of stacks within an unheated attic area is always problematic, particularly in this building where the bricks are extremely soft. Indeed they may now be too soft even for a lime mortar, which, as we know, must never be stronger than the surface to which it adheres. Otherwise, surely suffer the ensuing brick damage. Better, perhaps keep an eye on water from outside (down the sides of a stack and within a flue) and humidity levels within the Attic, and simply monitor the situation "as is".

When a brick deteriorates to a critical point, then its replacement with an appropriate historical one - which unfortunately was not the case in the earlier rebuilding of the stacks, etc. - is best.  It simply must match the existing brick in material, size, color, texture, and finish.

When a brick deteriorates to a critical point, then its replacement with an appropriate historical one - which unfortunately was not the case in the earlier rebuilding of the stacks, etc. - is best.  It simply must match the existing brick in material, size, color, texture, and finish. As for a removed brick, examples should be retained for exhibit (and purchase of reproductions) purposes.

10.

The 19th-20th century environment.

10.

Maintain the building's 19th-20th century historical record as much as possible, with exhibits and publications explaining the chronological differences.

11.

The issue of exterior drainage.

11.

Conduct an archaeological investigation of the landscape to determine if an historical rather than modern approach would address current drainage concerns.

12.

The modern furnace in the Basement.

12.

*Insurers now often require liners even for fuel fired devices and chimneys built to current standards require liners. The safety of the building must be maintained but this may be in conflict with preserving the heritage aspects of the property. There are several ways to satisfy both but first it is necessary to identify the insurers' requirements.

2008 Observation:

A steel flue liner has been inserted in the west stack.

When a high efficiency furnace puts out its exhaust into an uncapped or unlined chimney, it is putting out hot air full of moisture and some unburned impurities. This moisture wants to move toward the inner warmer attic instead of the colder temperatures outside of the building. In turn, this will hollow out the centre of bricks, which, if already soft, will occur sooner than later if no liner is in place. In addition, a steel liner should be insulated on its exterior (which is best) and capped at its top (which is best).

13.

The Basement Humidex Ventilation System.

13.

The single Basement Humidex Ventilation System has apparently arrested the relative humidity problem. However, its monitoring in all areas of the cellar is necessary on a continual basis to determine if the system as installed remains sufficient.

14.

The Basement duck boards.

 

14.

Recommended is the continued use of the duck boards whatever the original reasons for their placement. They restrain visitors from exploring areas of extreme sensitivity; they preserve the modern floor materials of crushed stone and underlying polyethylene sheathing; and, perhaps with barriers, should be extended to wherever the floor is now beginning to show wear and tear owing to the routine maintenance of modern services.

15.

The main girt system in the Basement

 

15.

The present vertical post system that supports the two, excessively long Basement main girts appear quite sufficient. However, four additional posts, one at each end of the two girts next to the foundation would perhaps relieve any latent anxiety concerning the affect of the load of the three flooring levels above and the pressure of the roof system.

16.

The issue of soft bricks.

 

 

16.

The control of water infiltration (fireplaces, attic stacks) and the maintenance of proper humidity levels (basement, attic) are critical to the long-term longevity of an historical asset suffering from an obvious fragility. Through time, their replacements will depend on the standard which the Society develops with respect to the material, size, color, texture, and finish of chosen bricks.

17.

The issue of cedar roofing shingles

 

17.

**The roof boards appear to be in excellent condition. The asphalt shingles have another c. 10 years of life. A cedar shingle replacement is envisioned.

Actually first in use might have been pine (yellow or white) rather than cedar shingles. Clearly their respective appearances would differ (pine would tend to cup, cedar might end up darker), as would their longevity (however, today's cedar (as well today’s pine) isn't as tight-grained, thus as long-lasting as in the past). Seasoned pine, however, is a stronger wood, suffers less in hail or high-wind situations, and in 19th-century New England, if of white pine, known to last on a roof 15-20 years untreated.

18.

The issue of insulation and venting.

18.

Installed, in the floor of the unheated Attic, is a loose- fill insulation. Placed upon a polyethylene sheathing set between an unusual, perhaps modern, set of east-west “joists,” this “vapour barrier” does not pass over these wooden members as recommended (See "The issue of paint” section).

Also, the Attic should be constantly monitored for excess frost during the winter. If it appears, additional venting may be required.

19.

The issue of wallpaper

19.

From assorted locations within the house recovered have been a variety of samples of wallpaper. Some original examples still remain in place. Their immediate analysis is essential before they are forgotten, lost, destroyed, or they deteriorate.

SOURCES