ERIC KRAUSE

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Random Internet Biographies ~ 

The Men and Women of the Siege of 1758 
against the Fortress of Louisbourg

By Eric Krause

(Krause House Info-Research Solutions, 2004-Present )

DRAFT (On-Going)

  

This is a location where the biographies of men and women in the Louisbourg attack of 1758 will be placed when encountered on the internet. If you have a name which appears here or not, be sure to also consult the following  database where, among other names, are the names of far many more siege participants than found in the evolving biography list below:

http://fortress.cbu.ca/webpub/Fwqaddnames.htm


GEORGE ALLSOPP

ALLSOPP, GEORGE, businessman, office holder, politician, and seigneur; b. c. 1733 in England; d. 14 April 1805 in Cap-Santé, Lower Canada. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JEFFERY AMHERST

AMHERST, JEFFERY, 1st Baron AMHERST, army officer; b. 29 Jan. 1717 (N.S.?) at Riverhead, Sevenoaks, England; d. 3 Aug. 1797 at his house Montreal near Sevenoaks. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JOHN HENRY BASTIDE

BASTIDE, JOHN HENRY, military engineer, army officer; b. c. 1700; parents and place of birth unknown; d. probably 1770. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


EDWARD BOSCAWEN

BOSCAWEN, EDWARD, naval officer; sometimes called “Wry-necked Dick” from a habit of cocking his head to one side; more commonly known as “Old Dreadnought”; b. 19 Aug. 1711 to Hugh Boscawen, 1st Viscount Falmouth, and Charlotte Godfrey; m. 11 Dec. 1742 to Frances Evelyn-Glanville; d. 10 Jan. 1761 at Hatchland’s Park, Surrey, England. The Boscawens, of ancient lineage, derived their name from the family seat in Cornwall, Boscawen Ros (or, the valley of the elder trees). Edward’s maternal grandmother was Arabella Churchill, the Duke of Marlborough’s remarkable sister. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JOHN, BREWSE (Bruce)

BREWSE (Bruce), JOHN, military engineer; m. Mary – ; d. 15 Sept. 1785 at Ipswich, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


RALPH BURTON

BURTON, RALPH, military officer, lieutenant governor of the town of Quebec, of the Trois-Rivières district, and of the Montreal district, brigadier (commander-in-chief) of the Northern Department; d. in 1768 at Scarborough, Yorkshire, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


HENRY CALDWELL

CALDWELL, HENRY, army and militia officer, politician, seigneur, landowner, businessman, and office holder; b. c. 1735 in Ireland, fourth son of Sir John Caldwell and Anne French; m. 16 May 1774 Ann Hamilton of Hampton Hall (Republic of Ireland), sister of Hugh Hamilton, bishop of Ossory; d. 28 May 1810 at Quebec, Lower Canada. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


WILLIAM CHENEY

http://pages.prodigy.com/QJNT72A/g0000117.htm

William Cheney, Birth: 8 Sep 1741, Newbury, Ma, Death: Apr 1803

William enlisted from Newbury, when a mere boy, in Captain William Davenport's Co. of Infantry for service in the French War. He was reported to be in Louisburg on June 13, 1759.

He married, and removed to an island in Passamaquoddy Bay, called Indian Island. After residing there a number of years, he made his residence at St. Andrews.

William in 1783 moved to Grand Menan in the province of New Brunswick. He settled on an Island, now called Cheney Island, situated between Ross Island and White Head in the Grand Manan Archipelage. When he moved to Grand Menan, it was inhabited by Indians who drove off the first families. But, by fair treatment, he won their friendship and secured permanent footing.

William's daughter, Barbara was the first white child born on Grand Manon. Her brother Moses was said to be the first white male child to be born to permanent settlers.
William was a very respectable farmer and fisherman.


JOHN CLARK [Tryon People's Cemetery , PEI ]

Soldier/Carpenter/Farmer
Ship's carpenter on Capt. Samuel Holland's ship the "Canceaux"
Was at Louisbourg and came to the Island with Lord Rollo during the expulsion of the Acadians
Was a part of Holland's Survey Crew

[Source: http://www.islandregister.com/burials/ip4.html  ]


GIBSON CLOUGH

A Journeal of mr gibson Cloughs from Salem In New - England untill he a Riveed at Louisbourg ... and what Happnead their from the First of June untill the End of the year In Two parts the one Ending with the year and the other Beginnig with the New In a Compnay Commanded by Capt gidding In A provenchal Reigment Commanded By Colln Jonathan Bagley Esqr in Cheaf


SILVANUS COBB

COBB, SILVANUS, mariner, military officer; b. 18 March 1709/10 at Plymouth, Massachusetts, son of Elisha Cobb and Lydia Rider; m. Elizabeth Rider 22 Oct. 1734 and had one daughter; d. probably at Havana, Cuba, in the summer of 1762. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JAMES COOK

COOK, JAMES, naval officer, surveyor, and explorer; b. 27 Oct. 1728 in Marton-in-Cleveland (Marton, North Yorkshire), England, the son of James Cook, a Scottish agricultural labourer, and Grace Pace, a local woman; d. 14 Feb. 1779 at Kealakekua Bay, Sandwich (Hawaiian) Islands. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 

Holland's Description Cape Breton Island (Halifax: PANS, Publication, No. 2; 1935) at p. 32. Stephen B. MacPhee, in his article, "DesBarres and His Contemporaries as Mapmakers" [NSHR, Volume #5, No. 2 (1985) at p. 19] sets out the story. It was just one day after the surrender of Louisbourg, that is to say, on July 28th, 1758, that Cook and Holland met on the beaches of Kennington Cove. "Cook [who was then serving on the Pembroke as a lead hand and not as an officer, as he came to be] had gone ashore and his curiosity was aroused by an officer carrying a small square table mounted on a tripod. The officer would set the table down, sight along the top in many directions, and then write in a notebook. The two men struck up a conversation and Cook discovered that his chance companion was Captain Samuel Holland ..."


NICHOLAS COX

COX, NICHOLAS, army officer and colonial administrator; b. c. 1724 in England; m. Deborah – ; d. 8 Jan. 1794 at Quebec. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


DES BARRES, JOSEPH FREDERICK WALLET  DES BARRES

DES BARRES, JOSEPH FREDERICK WALLET (baptized Joseph-Frédéric Vallet Des Barres), army officer, military engineer, surveyor, colonizer, and colonial administrator; b. November 1721, either in Basel, Switzerland, or in Paris, eldest of three children of Joseph-Leonard Vallet Des Barres and Anne-Catherine Cuvier; with Mary Cannon he had six children and with Martha Williams eleven; d. 27 Oct. 1824 in Halifax. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 


JOSIAH DODGE

Josiah Dodge (b. ca. 1718) was a native of Massachusetts and served in the expedition against Louisbourg in 1758. The following year he assisted in the survey of Granville Township, then returned to Massachusetts, but came back to Nova Scotia in 1761 with his family and the machinery for a grist mill. When the first Granville Township grant was voided on a legality and a new one had to be issued, Dodge was appointed to carry out the details.

[Source: http://www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/easson/biographies.asp?Language=English] 


PHILIP DURELL

DURELL, PHILIP, naval officer; b. 1707 at St Helier, Jersey, and baptized there 25 May 1707; son of John Durell, solicitor general of Jersey, and Elizabeth Corbet; m. his first cousin Madeline Saumarez, secondly a Bristol lady named Skey, thirdly the widow of Captain Wittewronge Taylor; d. 26 Aug. 1766 at Halifax, Nova Scotia, “from eating dolphins.” - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 

See also: http://www.cichw.net/pmdurell.html 


MICAJAH GLEASON

"Micajah Gleason, (Ebenezer, John, Thomas, Thomas) b. Framingham, Mass., Oct. 17, 1740 ; d. White Plains, Mass. Oct. 28, 1776 [sic]. He m. in Framingham 1762, Hannah, dau. of Josiah and Hannah (Barron) Drury, who was b. Framingham May 27, 1744 and d. Sudbury, Sept. 26, 1831.

Children: All born in Framingham, Mass.
I. Betty, (bp.) Sept. 2, 1764; m. Jacob Reed, Jr.
II. Hannah, (bp.) Apr. 5, 1767; m. 1st Abel Reed ; m. 2nd Wm. Clark.

Micajah lived near Saxonville, on the place recently owned by the late Joseph Angier.

He was in the Louisburg expedition in 1758; was captain of a company of Minute Men in the Lexington Alarm; was also captain in Col. John Nixon's 5th Regt. Apr. 23 to Aug. 1, 1775, and later captain of 3rd Co. in Lieut. Col. Nixon's 4th Regt. He was killed in the battle of White Plains [sic], Oct. 28, 1776."
  


  BENJAMIN GOLDTHWAIT

GOLDTHWAIT, BENJAMIN, military officer; b. in Boston, Massachusetts, 25 Nov. 1704 (o.s.), son of John Goldthwait and Sarah Hopkins; m. 10 Oct. 1726 to Charity Edwards; d. 10 May 1761. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JOSEPH GOREHAM (Gorham)

GOREHAM (Gorham), JOSEPH, army officer and officer-holder; b. 29 May 1725 in Barnstable, Massachusetts, sixth son of Shobal (Shubael) Gorham and Mary Thacter and brother of John Gorham*; m. 29 Dec. 1764 Anne Spry at Halifax, Nova Scotia, and they had six children; m. secondly in 1787 Elizabeth Hunter; d. 20 July 1790 at Calais, France. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


FRANCIS GREEN

GREEN, FRANCIS, army officer, office holder, author, and judge; b. 21 Aug. 1742 in Boston, Mass., second son of Benjamin Green* and Margaret Pierce; m. there first 18 Oct. 1769 Susanna Green, his double cousin, and they had five children; m. secondly 19 May 1785 Harriet Mathews, daughter of David Mathews*, in Halifax, N.S., and they had six children; d. 21 April 1809 in Medford, Mass. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


RICHARD GRIDLEY

GRIDLEY, RICHARD, army officer, military engineer, and entrepreneur; b. 3 Jan. 1710/11 in Boston, Massachusetts, son of Richard and Rebecca Gridley; m. 25 Feb. 1730/31 Hannah Deming in Boston, and they had nine children; m. secondly 21 Oct. 1751 Sarah Blake in Boston; d. 21 June 1796 in Stoughton, Mass. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


HENRY HAMILTON

HAMILTON, HENRY, army officer and colonial administrator; b. c. 1734, probably in Dublin (Republic of Ireland), younger of two sons of Henry Hamilton, member of the Irish parliament for Donegal and collector of the port of Cork, and Mary Dawson; m. 19 March 1795 Elizabeth Lee, and they had at least one daughter; d. 29 Sept. 1796 on Antigua. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 

http://www.bermuda-online.org/seecity.htm 

Hamilton, Bermuda's capital and a port city, is named after Henry Hamilton. He was British Lieutenant Governor and then full Governor here from 1788 to 1794 and got this municipality started. Born in Dublin, Ireland, in 1734,

Henry Hamilton spent his youth in Cork. He was commissioned into the 15th Regiment of Foot in the British Army. He earned distinction in British victories at the battles of Louisburg and Quebec in the Seven Years War.


THOMAS HANDFIELD

We know a fair amount about the third son of John, Thomas, who is at the origin of the French-Canadian (Québec) descendants. He is my direct ancestor.

Thomas was born January 6th 1741. He joined the 40th Regiment in 1752 and was only 14 years old during the deportation of the Acadians. Without any doubt, he witnessed some gruesome and inhumane scenes during that period. The belief in the family is that it was the reason why he abandoned his parents. We can easily suppose that those memories greatly influenced his decisions immediately after the end of the Seven Years War.

In 1757, the 47th Regiment was located in Halifax preparing an expedition against Louisbourg. The expedition was abandoned that year but was resumed the following year. Hence, in 1758, the 47th Regiment was part of the brigade led by Wolfe that disembarked at Corromandiere Cove, since renamed Kennington Cove. Kennington was the name of the frigate that, together with the frigate Halifax, was protecting the soldiers prior to disembarkation. The cove was located approximately six miles from the fortress, near where the French retrenchments ended.

After the capture of Louisbourg, the 40th Regiment, including Thomas, stayed in garrison for the winter while the 47th returned to Boston. The following spring, troops from New York, Boston and Annapolis-Royal assembled in Halifax and travelled together to Louisbourg. There they met with a convoy from England on their way to the siege of Québec City. It is at this occasion, on May 23rd, 1759, in Louisbourg, that Thomas was promoted to the rank of Ensign with the 47th Regiment by General James Wolfe, Commander of the English Fleet, requested by the General Thomas Bell.

... Ensign Thomas Handfield, 47th Regiment of Foot at Québec in 1759 would have worn the uniform illustrated. [not included here - see website listed below] The hat is royal blue trimmed with white. The uniform and sash are red trimmed with white. The pants and leggings are white with black trim and buttons. The boots are black. The illustration is based upon an original drawing by Alan H. Archambault in the Public Record Office, Chancery Lane, London, England. Only the uniform is authenticated.

On June 6th 1759, the English armed forces departed for the mouth of the St-Lawrence River under the orders of General James Wolfe, born at Westerham, Kent, January 2nd 1727, son of Lieutenant-General Edward Wolfe and of Henrietta Thompson. On their way to Québec City, they took prisoner a pilot from the island of Ile-aux-Coudres in the St-Lawrence. Jean Denys de Vitray was constrained to pilot the English warships to Quebec City under the threat of death. The convoy reached Ile d'Orléans on June 26th where the troops disembarked and established camp. The artillery was located on the heights of Pointe-Levy from where the canons could reach the City of Québec.

The French Forces were commanded by the General Louis-Joseph Marquis of Montcalm assisted by the Colonel Louis-Antoine Count of Bougainville. This later was responsible for the communications between Quebec and Montreal.

A first attempt at disembarkation, somewhere between Québec and Montmorency was foiled by the well-established French army. An attempt by the latter to burn the English warships using inflamed rafts also failed.

Between the end of June and the beginning of September, both armies tempted attacks in vain. The good season was coming to a close and the English were considering abandoning the siege to return only the following year. Three brigadiers: Monckton, Townsend and Murray submitted a new plan to Wolfe. The plan, which consisted of disembarkation on the high side of the city, was readily accepted. Wolfe himself chose the location of the 'Anse-au-Foulon', the only possible access point. M. de Bougainville had stationed at that location Commandant Vergor and one hundred soldiers. During the night of September 12th 1759, 1800 English soldiers left their warships and climbed the cliff to take by surprise the soldiers of the Vergor camp. It happened that there were only thirty of them present that night.( The others had permission to leave the camp because it was harvest time.)After taking them prisoners, the English had free access to the Plains of Abraham.

By 5am the next day, Wolfe had assembled 4800 troops opposite the French army under the command of Montcalm (See the engagement plan). The 47th Regiment was on the front line, facing the Languedoc and La Sarre Regiments only 1500 feet away. Their location was on the North side of the Sillery Road, near a road called today "Grande-Allée", approximately three-quarter of a mile away from the Gate St-Louis of the city.

The engagement started around 10am. Wolfe had ordered his men not to fire and to put two bullets in their rifle. They received the order to fire only when they closed in within fifty yards of the French. A large number of French soldiers died at once. Wolfe then ordered the Louisbourg Grenadiers and the Bragg Regiment to charge with their bayonet. In fifteen minutes the battle was won, the French army routed.

At the beginning of the engagement, Wolfe was injured to his wrist, then a few moments later to the groin. Finally, during the charge, a bullet went through his lung. He died on the battlefield surrounded by several of his Officers. His embalmed body was sent to England on the ship "Royal William" for burial in the family's lot in Greenwich where his father was buried a few years before.

For his part, Montcalm was hit to the tight and entrails while trying to regroup his soldiers. He managed to return, fatally wounded, to the City sitting on his black horse and supported by three of his Officers. He had sufficient time to put his affairs in order before dying at 5am on the next day, September 14th. His funeral was held that same day at 9pm followed by his burial at the convent of the Ursulines.

Our ancestor, Thomas, lived through all the events of September 13th, 1759 without being injured. He was not so lucky on April 26th of the following year during the battle of Ste-Foy when Duke de Levis attempted to regain the City of Québec. Murray's report. Corporal François Duke of Levis was second Commander of the French army. When Montcalm died he replaced him commanding the 7000 soldiers. The English were defeated and retreated inside the city waiting for reenforcements. The French army left siege and returned to Montreal.

Thomas injuries were not fatal however and he remained in garrison in Québec City until the Treaty of Paris in 1763.See document He was only 19 years old when he was injured and, while he had to live in a ravaged city, he was still in the company of nice Québec ladies.

Common miseries perhaps foster lifelong friendships. During the war, it was not possible for an English Officer to marry an "enemy" but together they could always wish for an early end to the war. They wished very hard and on May 8th 1761, Thomas, born the previous day, was christened. The registry of the parish of Notre-Dame of Québec quotes "… du légitime mariage de Thomas…" (of the legitimate marriage of Thomas), which was crossed out and continued by "…de parents inconnus…" (of unknown parents). Louis Marchand and Marie-Joseph Lozé were Godfather and Godmother respectively. Here is another reason in favour of Thomas' choice for his future life.

[Source: http://www.handfield.ca/documentsen/page9.htm ]


SIR CHARLES HARDY

HARDY, Sir CHARLES, naval officer, colonial administrator, and office-holder; b. c. 1714, son of Vice-Admiral Sir Charles Hardy and Elizabeth Burchett; m. July 1749 Mary Tate; m. secondly 4 Jan. 1759 Catherine Stanyan, and they had three sons and two daughters; d. 18 May 1780 at Portsmouth, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


COL. JOHN HART

Chapter VII ... Col. John Hart of Portsmouth, a part of which was ordered to join a second expedition against Louisburg, and the remainder to serve on the western frontier. Of ...

[Original Web source not presently active]  

In 1758, a regiment of New Hampshire troops was raised, commanded by Col. John Hart of Portsmouth, a part of which was ordered to join a second expedition against Louisburg, and the remainder to serve on the western frontier. Of this regiment Rev. Daniel Emerson was Chaplain, and Dr. John Hale, Surgeon. Of its Sixth company, Ebenezer Jaquith was Second Lieutenant and Josiah Brown, Ensign. Besides the foregoing, there were also in the same company sixteen Hollis soldiers, making in all twenty Hollis men in this regiment, viz.: Nathaniel Blood, Joseph Easterbrook, Jonathan Fowler, James French, Samuel Hazeltine, James Hubbard, (Hobart), Thomas Nevins, Ebenezer Pierce, Whitcomb Powers, Thomas Powers, Isaac Stearns, Samuel Stearns, James Taylor, Abel Webster, Peter Wheeler and John Willoughby.

[Original Web source not presently active] 

The Military History of The State Of New Hampshire 1623-1861 by Chandler E Porter Volume 1 states: " IN 1758 New Hampshire raised still another regiment for "the Crown Point Expedition." This numbered eight hundred men, and was commanded by Col. Joh Hart, of Portsmouth. A portion of the regiment was ordered to join the expedition against Louisburg, and remainder did duty under Lieut. Col. Goffe, on the western frontier." Company 7 commanded by Captain Alexander Todd included Wm Gamble who entered service April 26 1758 as a private and was discharged November 27, 1758. Todd was also as Scotsman from Northern Ireland.


LORD CHARLES HAY

HAY, Lord CHARLES, army officer, member of parliament;b. c. 1705, possibly at Linplum, East Lothian, Scotland, to Charles Hay, 3rd Marquess of Tweeddale, and Susannah Cochrane, Countess of Dundonald, née Hamilton; d. unmarried, 1 May 1760, in London, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


MOSES HAZEN

HAZEN, MOSES, army officer, office holder, landowner, seigneur, and merchant; b. 1 June 1733 in Haverhill, Mass., third child of Moses Hazzen, merchant, and Abigail White; m. 5 Dec. 1770 Charlotte de La Saussaye in Montreal, Que.; they had no children; d. 5 Feb. 1803 in Troy, N.Y., and was buried 8 February in Albany, N.Y. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


ANTHONY HENRY

HENRY, ANTHONY (also Anton Heinrich or Henrich), printer and publisher; b. 1734 near Montbéliard (France) of German parents; d. 1 Dec. 1800 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


CAPTAIN SAMUEL JOHANNES HOLLAND

HOLLAND, SAMUEL JOHANNES, army officer, military engineer, surveyor, office holder, politician, and landowner; b. 1728 in Nijmegen, Netherlands; d. 28 Dec. 1801 at Quebec, Lower Canada. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 

Holland's Description Cape Breton Island (Halifax: PANS, Publication, No. 2; 1935) at p. 32. Stephen B. MacPhee, in his article, "DesBarres and His Contemporaries as Mapmakers" [NSHR, Volume #5, No. 2 (1985) at p. 19] sets out the story. It was just one day after the surrender of Louisbourg, that is to say, on July 28th, 1758, that Cook and Holland met on the beaches of Kennington Cove. "Cook [who was then serving on the Pembroke as a lead hand and not as an officer, as he came to be] had gone ashore and his curiosity was aroused by an officer carrying a small square table mounted on a tripod. The officer would set the table down, sight along the top in many directions, and then write in a notebook. The two men struck up a conversation and Cook discovered that his chance companion was Captain Samuel Holland ..."


JONATHAN LEONARD

Jonathan Leonard was born in Lyme, Connecticut but married Sarah Dodge in 1764 after he arrived in Nova Scotia. He may have served in the expedition against Louisbourg in 1758. Leonard owned 1000 acres of excellent land in Granville Township, but sold this property when the Loyalists arrived, moving instead to the Paradise area where he built one of the first sawmills in the township. He received his commissions of First Lieutenant, Annapolis County Militia, in 1773, and Captain, Annapolis County Militia, in 1782. Various sources state he died in 1802, 1811 or 1812.

[Source: http://www.gov.ns.ca/nsarm/virtual/easson/biographies.asp?Language=English] 


ZACHARY MACAULAY

MACAULAY, ZACHARY, sailor, merchant, seigneur, manager of the Saint-Maurice ironworks, jp, and militia officer; b. c. 1739; m. Genevieve Burrow, and they had three sons and three daughters; d. 18 April 1821 in Montreal. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


PATRICK MACKELLAR

MACKELLAR, PATRICK, military engineer; b. 1717; m. Elizabeth Basaline, probably on Minorca, and they had two sons; d. 22 Oct. 1778 on Minorca. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


CAPTAIN THOMAS MONCRIEFFE (1725-1791)

On the Executive Council at Sydney
  


MONTRESOR (Montrésor), JOHN

MONTRESOR (Montrésor), JOHN, military engineer; b. 22 April 1736 at Gibraltar, son of James Gabriel Montresor and Mary Haswell; m. 1 March 1764 Frances Tucker, in New York City, and they had six surviving children; d. 26 June 1799 in Maidstone prison, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


ALEXANDER MURRAY

MURRAY, ALEXANDER, army officer; probably b. c. 1715 at Cringletie, Peeblesshire, Scotland, eldest son of Alexander Murray; d. 19 March 1762 at Martinique. By his wife Marianne, whom he married in 1749, he had three children, the youngest of whom he named James Wolfe Murray. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JAMES WOLFE MURRAY

MURRAY, JAMES, army officer and colonial administrator; b. 21 Jan. 1721/22 at Ballencrieff (Lothian), the family seat in Scotland, fifth son and 14th child of Alexander Murray, 4th Baron Elibank, and Elizabeth Stirling; m. 17 Dec. 1748 Cordelia Collier, d. 26 June 1779; m. secondly on 14 March 1780 on Minorca, Anne Witham (Whitham), d. 2 Aug. 1784, and they had six children, four of whom reached maturity; d. 18 June 1794 at Beauport House, near Battle, Sussex, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 

Copy of the Epitaph on the tombstone of James Wolfe Murray, 1759-1836. His father was Alexander Murray. James was born in Louisbourg.


JOHN NAIRNE

NAIRNE, JOHN, army and militia officer and seigneur; b. 1 March 1731 in Scotland; d. 14 July 1802 at Quebec, Lower Canada. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JOSEPH PETERS

PETERS, JOSEPH, soldier, schoolmaster, and postmaster; b. 11 Dec. 1729 in Dedham, Massachusetts, eldest child of William Peters and Hannah Chenery; m. Abigail Thompson and they had three children; d. 13 Feb. 1800 at Halifax, Nova Scotia. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 

 


ERASMUS JAMES PHILIPPS

Founder of Freemasonry in Canada By Hon. John Doull, Grand Historian, Grand Lodge of Nova 

[Note: The earliest military lodge to work in America was No. 85, I.C. (Irish Constitution), in Frampton's (30th) Regiment of Foot; it was stationed in the garrison at Louisbourg, Cape Breton Island, in 1746 - To date, an undocumented assertion

[David Wooster Connecticut Brigadier General, died of wounds 1777 Presumed to have been made a Mason in a military lodge in Louisbourg, Charter Master of Hiram Lodge No. 1 in New Haven, the 1st Lodge in Connecticut, 1750 - To date, an undocumented assertion]


 

CHARLES RAMAGE PRESCOTT

PRESCOTT, CHARLES RAMAGE, merchant, politician, justice of the peace, office holder, and horticulturist; b. 6 Jan. 1772 in Halifax, seventh child and fourth son of Jonathan Prescott and Anne Blagden; m. first 6 Feb. 1796 Hannah Whidden (d. 1813), and they had seven children; m. secondly 9 Feb. 1814 Mariah Hammill, and they had five children; d. 11 June 1859 in Cornwallis, N.S. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


CAPTAIN GEORGE RAYMOND [RAYMENT]

http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.com/~raymondfamily/BalchStreet.html

Lapham traces the ownership of the property at #120, but doesn't indicate when the house was constructed. The westerly part of the elder John Rayment's land that fell to his son Nathaniel (1670-1749/50) passed into the ownership of Nathaniel's son, George Raymond (1707-1807). Captain George Raymond was in the Cape Breton expedition of 1758, and in the stirring days before the Revolutionary War he took an active part. George moderated a Beverly meeting in which the town took measures to prevent the use of English tea
Historic Raymond Homes on New Balch Street, Beverly, Massachusetts

gsbgrafx.com/westfamilyweb/west/westwbg/wga12.html [Not presently active]

Raymond, George (1707 - 1807) - male
b. 21 Dec 1707 d. 27 Mar 1807 father: Raymond, Nathaniel (1670 - 1749)
mother: Conant, Rebbeca (1671 - 1760) George was in the Cape Breton Expedition, 1758, and is mentioned in Beverly records as moderator of a meeting at which measures were adopted to suppress the use of tea.
George Scott

http://earlyamerica.com/review/winter96/scott.html

Major Scott's Provisional Light Infantry Battalion by George A. Bray III The British Flag Flew Over the French Fortress of Louisbourg in July of 1758-- But Not Before Major George Scott and His Strike Force of Light Troops and Rangers Conducted Their 'Irregular' Tactics To Pave The Way For Victory


DAVID RAMSAY

RAMSAY, DAVID, sailor and fur trader; b. probably c. 1740 in Leven (Fife), Scotland; d. in or after 1810, probably in Upper Canada. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
   


ROBERTSON, GOVERNOR JAMES

He was born in Newbigging, Fifeshire, circa, 1720. He was in his youth a private and then a sergeant in the British army, and 1740 at Carthagena, New Granada, gained an ensigncy. He came to the Colony in 1756, being appointed Major of the 1st Battalion of the 60th or Royal Americans, December, 1755. In May, 1758, he was appointed by General Abercromby, Deputy Quarter-Master-General of the army in North America. He accompanied the expedition against Louisburg in 1758 and was promoted to be Lieut.-Colonel in the army July 8 of that year. In 1772 he became Colonel in the army. In July, 1775, he was stationed at Boston, was appointed Major-General in America in 1776, and Colonel commanding the 60th in January following. He accompanied the army under Howe to Staten Island, commanded the 6th Brigade in the engagement of the first of August, and afterwards in the Battle of Long Island, coming shortly thereafter to New York City. In 1778 he was appointed Colonel of the 16th Regiment, and in 1779 received a commission as Governor of New York, and was accordingly sworn in March 23, 1780. While Governor his official title was as follows: "His Excellency James Robertson, Esq., Captain-General and Governor in Chief of the Province of New York and Territories thereupon depending in America, Vice-Admiral of the same and Major-General of His Majesty's forces." He became Lieutenant-General in 1782, embarked for England in 1783, and died there March 4, 1788.

[Source: http://www.bklyn-genealogy-info.com/Society/1785.St.Andrew.Bio.html  - 1756-1806 BIOGRAPHICAL REGISTER OF SAINT ANDREW'S SOCIETY THE STATE OF NEW YORK PART 1 COLONIAL TIMES (1756-1783)


ANDREW ROLLO

ROLLO, ANDREW, 5th Baron ROLLO in the peerage of Scotland, army officer; b. 18 Nov. 1703 at Duncrub, Perthshire, Scotland, the eldest son of Robert, 4th Baron Rollo, and Mary Rollo; m. 22 April 1727 to Catharine Murray; m. 16 Feb. 1765 to Elizabeth Moray; d. 2 June 1765 in Leicester, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


GEORGE SCOTT

SCOTT, GEORGE, army officer; date and place of birth unknown; d. as the result of a duel fought, probably on 6 Nov. 1767, in Dominica. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JAMES SHEPHERD

SHEPHERD, JAMES, militia officer and office holder; b. c. 1730; d. unmarried 10 Jan. 1822 at Quebec. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


SIR HERVEY SMYTHE (Smyth)

SMYTHE (Smyth), Sir HERVEY, army officer and topographical painter; b. 30 May 1734 in Ampton, England, son of Sir Robert Smythe and Lady Louisa Carolina Isabelle Hervey, daughter of John Hervey, 1st Earl of Bristol; d. unmarried 25 Sept. 1811 in Elmswell, Suffolk, England, and was buried at West Ham (London). - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


BARRIMORE MATTHEW ST LEGER

ST LEGER, BARRIMORE MATTHEW (Barry), army officer; the name is variously pronounced “Sill’inger” and “Saint Leg’er”; baptized 1 May 1733, probably in County Kildare (Republic of Ireland), son of Sir John St Leger and Lavina Pennefather; m. 7 April 1773 a Miss Bayly, widow of Sir Edward Mansel, and they had at least one son; d. 1789. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


PATRICK SUTHERLAND

SUTHERLAND, PATRICK, military officer; fl. 1746; d. c. 1766. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


ROBERT SWANTON

SWANTON, ROBERT, naval officer; d. 11 July 1765, probably in St James’ parish, Westminster, London, England. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JAMES THOMPSON

THOMPSON, JAMES, soldier and office holder; b. 1733 in Tain, Scotland, son of James Thompson; d. 25 Aug. 1830 at Quebec. James Thompson probably came from a Jacobite family subjected to repression by the English after the battle of Culloden in 1746. He must have studied civil engineering, since he later put his knowledge in that field at the service of the British army. Like many young men from war-impoverished Scotland who were attracted by the promise of land grants, he enlisted in 1757 in the 78th Foot, known as Fraser’s Highlanders, which had been raised to fight in North America. He chose the company commanded by his cousin, Captain Charles Baillie, who made him a sergeant and promised him an officer’s commission in the event of an opening. Baillie’s death the following year put an end to his chances of promotion. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


WINCKWORTH TONGE

TONGE, WINCKWORTH, army officer, officeholder, politician, and landowner; b. 4 Feb. 1727/28 in County Wexford (Republic of Ireland); m. Martha Cottnam, and they had four sons, including William Cottnam*; d. 2 Feb. 1792 in Halifax, Nova Scotia. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  
  


EDWARD WHITMORE

WHITMORE, EDWARD, army officer, governor of Cape Breton Island and the Island of St John (Prince Edward Island); b. c. 1694, apparently the son of Captain Arthur Whitmore of York, whose will refers to a son Edward; d. 1761. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


GEORGE WILLIAMSON

WILLIAMSON, GEORGE, army officer; b. c. 1704, probably in England; d. 10 Nov. 1781 at Woolwich (London), England. He had at least one son, Adam, who served as an engineer officer in North America during the Seven Years’ War and later rose to the rank of lieutenant-general. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


MONTAGU WILMOT

WILMOT, MONTAGU, military officer, governor of Nova Scotia; place and date of birth unknown; son of Christopher Wilmot and Anne Montagu; d. 23 May 1766 at Halifax, Nova Scotia. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html 
  


JAMES WOLFE

WOLFE, JAMES, army officer, commander of the British expedition that took Quebec in 1759; b. 2 Jan. 1727 (N.S.) at Westerham, England; d. 13 Sept 1759 of wounds received in the battle of the Plains of Abraham. He was the son of Lieutenant-General Edward Wolfe, a respectable but not particularly distinguished officer, and Henrietta Thompson. - For the complete biography, including go to Dictionary of Canadian Biography Online:  http://www.biographi.ca/en/index.html